OpenStand recognizes the support of OpenStand partners and advocates in the wake of its two year anniversary

In the wake of OpenStand’s two year anniversary, we’d like to take a moment to recognize the support of OpenStand partners and advocates. The goal of OpenStand remains simple: to mobilize ongoing, global support for the application of open, market-driven principles in technology and standards development, and keep development open to a worldwide community of innovators.

Here are a few highlights from our affirming partners:

“As Chair of the IETF when OpenStand was announced, and Chair of the IAB today, I believe also that these principles are fundamental to the Internet’s future success—and that they establish a broader paradigm for standards covering many topics that are fundamental to a thriving global economy and the social wellbeing. The role of standards development organizations is often hidden in everyday life, but the impact of standards is felt by billions of people everyday.”

- Russ Housley, IAB Chair for the IETF blog.

“Looking at the benefits infographicI observe that some, or even most, benefits are generic and apply to the other standards development paradigms as well. But the OpenStand paradigm results in a unique combination of benefits. OpenStand makes explicit what most of us know: The success of the Internet is dependent upon the way it has been developed. In the Internet Society’s “Internet Invariants” paper, this is explained as: “The Internet requires some basic agreements and social behaviour – between technologies and between humans,” after which the paper enumerates “interoperability and mutual agreement,” “collaboration,” and “reusable [technology] building blocks.” All these resonate with the OpenStand principles. The final invariant, “There are no permanent favorites,” is embedded in the voluntary OpenStand principle.

- Mr. Olaf Kolkman, Chief Internet Technology Officer for ISOC for the ISOC blog.

“We would like to encourage governments around the world to refer to and adopt the OpenStand principles, for that harmonization will create positive network effects in the global IT market.”

-Daniel Dardailler, Associate Chair for Europe and Director of International Relations
for W3c for the W3C blog.

We would also like to stand the community of OpenStand advocates for their tremendous support and participation.  The global participation on our survey reflects the nature and scope of the OpenStand Principles. You can view the results of our survey here.

As OpenStand moves forward with the support of the community and Partners. It is our hope that OpenStand values will form the bedrock for future technology innovation. As the world seeks to solve modern collaboration, standardization, security and privacy challenges, applying the OpenStand Principles will play an essential role in securing the future of open, inclusive, market-driven innovation.

Thank you once again for standing with us.

I joined the W3C staff in 1997 as a technical writer. My first assignment was to work on the W3C Process Document, which describes how W3C turns ideas into standards. My understanding of what happened before I arrived is that W3C Members had begun in 1996 to demand a more formal description of how the organization would work. A committee was formed to draw up the document. I began to edit it mid-1997, and, we adopted the first Process Document for W3C on 11 November 1999.

The principles that we would later formalize with our peers as OpenStand Principles were apparent even in our first process document. Here are a few examples:

  • Consensus: Declared “Integral to the W3C process” right from the start.
  • Transparency: The process required public versions of documents at least every three months. This requirement was put in place because in the early days many W3C Working Groups did not conduct their discussions on public mailing lists. Today groups conduct their technical discussions in public.
  • Availability: All formal publications from draft to standard have always been publicly available at no cost.

I remained editor through the 2005 revision, which remained the operative W3C process for 9 years until we (finally!) replaced it in August 2014.

The Process Document is an important manifestation of our organizational vision. For 20 years, W3C has sought to create an environment where competitors collaborate with respect and due process. We have stumbled at times, but as a result have become more transparent, inclusive, and effective, essentially growing into the OpenStand principles (see our 2012 self-evaluation). We are actively expanding and evolving today, keeping OpenStand principles in mind as we go, as CEO Jeff Jaffe did this week in a blog post, Decision by consensus or by informed editor; which is better?

We will mark W3C’s 20th anniversary on 29 October with a Symposium and Gala Dinner in Santa Clara, California. Please join us as we discuss the future of the organization, as well as the future of the Web.

w3c-20-anniversary-symposium-the-future-of-the-web

———————————————————————————————————————————-

ian-jacobs-w3c

This blog post was written by Ian Jacobs. He is the Head of W3C Marketing and Communications. He has a background in software engineering, spent 7 years writing Web standards at W3C, and has been in his current role for 10 years.

Every day, online and offline, open standards benefit humanity.  In our modern world, posting blog content, searching the web and sending/receiving mail has become second nature – and many of the underpinning technologies that support these tasks leverage open standards.

To illustrate how this works in her life, Anna, the Community Manager at phpList, created the infographic below in celebration of 2014 Document Freedom Day.  Says Anna,  “Basically every task I do as phpList Community Manager uses Open Standards of some kind. Writing this blog, for example, used http, ip, www and html to name just a few. Also, while I write I am using IRC and xmpp to talk with my phpList friends and colleagues. A sizable portion of my day is spent replying to emails, which uses a whole host of Open Protocols, ranging from openPGP to imap and smtp.”

php-document-freedom-day-infographic-open-standards-phplist

She continues, “Open Standards really are vital to our ability to work together on-line, without them we could not communicate or collaborate…so my life would be a colossal bore!”

Anna’s infographic provides a simple illustration of how open standards have improved the way she lives, works and communicates.  In truth, every day — online and offline — open standards improve life for people around the world and play an essential role as building blocks for technology innovation and economic growth.

While we don’t know if Anna is an OpenStand supporter, we like the insights she provides here and thought we’d share. You can view her full post, here.

OpenStand celebrates the contributions of the open developments community and advocates for a set of proven OpenStand Principles to drive standards and technology development.  We hope you’ll Stand With Us as an advocate for an open future.

A snippet of SVG code generated in Inkscape.
A snippet of SVG code generated in Inkscape.

OpenStand principles are applied to applications everyday.  One example of this can be seen in a commonly used standard file format used by the print and digital design community, known as Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG).  A member of the Libre Graphics Magazine community recently highlighted SVG as one of their favorite open standards because they use it on a daily basis for design.

SVG is an XML-based format for vector graphics, developed by the W3C. As an open standard, anyone can develop software and programs that include and build off of SVG files. In its current form, the open standard of SVG 1.1 defines a language, and ultimately a format, with a diverse set of capabilities. It includes common features, like vector shapes, paths and text rendering; and features not commonly known, like animation and interactivity.

SVG is a standard that aligns to the Principles of OpenStand on several levels.  SVG is open, it adheres to the principles of standards development,  it is collectively empowered, broadly available and people can leverage SVG voluntarily.

SVG isn’t a standard created by W3C employees — the volunteer committee working on the SVG standard is comprised of professionals from a diverse array of global participants.  Some  work for companies with an interest in SVG, while others are simply involved members of the public.  Having diverse interests represented, and global participation from people with different knowledge, cultures, thought processes enriches the development process and helps ensure that no single entity or interest dominates the standards development process.

SVG is also a product that can be used voluntarily by anyone, and built upon by anyone.  As a result, rather than investing time in a closed, proprietary standard with limited access, participants end up developing an open, freely available standard that can benefit everyone, and upon which anyone can innovate.

Part of the beauty open standards is that they never have to die:  their specifications will always be available, and can continue to improve over time, because they are not tied to a specific company or program.  They will continue to exist long as they are relevant and address market needs.

You can read more on Libre Graphics Magazine Series highlighting SVG as an open standard here. 

Many humanitarian organizations, from The World Bank to the International Aid Transparency Initiative, have integrated principles of open information into their mission and efforts. They believe that an investment in better, open information is an investment in better, open development.The World Bank works to end extreme poverty and promote shared prosperity in the developing world. Open development is about making information and data freely available and searchable, encouraging feedback, information-sharing, and accountability. The World Bank is also working to make their data, knowledge and research more open, to foster innovation and increase transparency in development, aid flows and finances.

The World Bank currently has three different APIs that enable access to different datasets: one for Indicators (or time series data), one for Projects (or data on the World Bank’s operations), and one for the World Bank financial data (World Bank Finances API). All three APIs implement RESTful interfaces to allow users to perform queries of available data using selection parameters. The World Bank Indicators API lets users programmatically access more than 8,000 indicators and query the data in several ways, using defined parameters to narrow searches and requests.

Similar to The World Bank, Openaid.se is a web-based information service about Swedish aid built on open government data. They are working to combat poverty and understand that a key part of their success lies in open and transparent access to information and collaboration with others on ideas. They guarantee that public documents and public information about Swedish aid is made available on the web in both Swedish and English. The hub for statistics and documents about Swedish development cooperation will soon be moving to the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) Standard API.

The IATI makes information about aid spending easier to access, use and understand. IATI Standard is the accompanying technical publishing framework allowing data to be compared. One of the standards in place is the IATI codelists, Numerical codes are used to represent many standard values in an IATI data file, which ensure the information is comparable among different publishers.

The IATI APIs include the IATI Datastore, online service that gathers all data published to the IATI standard into a single queryable source; OIPA, used for parsing, ingesting, storing and searching IATI standard compliant datasets; and AidData, which allows for programmatic access to the catalogue of AidData information.

Challenges of the IATI APIs and other international aid open information sources include timely and forward looking data, data quality, access and use of data, and governance.  For more information on open standards and APIs used to improve public service delivery in the developing world, check out this Slideshare.

The author, Pernilla Näsfors, is a Development Data Specialist at the World Bank, helping recipients of aid to open and standardize the data in their country systems. At the Nordic APIs Stockholm conference on March 31, 2014, Näsfors shared her experiences working with other international aid donors and local governments at the World Bank, as well as insights from her previous job as the product manager of the Openaid.se website at the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), one of the first Swedish government websites with an open API.

 

blog-openstand-how-to-become-an-advocate

OpenStand was formed to align standards development organizations and the open development community itself with a time-tested set of principles or values for open, collaborative, market-driven technology development.  It is our hope that our supporters will carry those values into every-day life and apply them to collaboration, consensus-building, development, policy making, technology development and public awareness efforts.  Here’s how you can become an OpenStand Advocate.

  • Sign Your Name on our public registry, as show of your private or corporate support
  • Become personally active:
    • Embody the principles in a personal/professional capacity
    • Become informed on key areas of national/international debate and policy making that impact the future of open technology development
    • Help ensure OpenStand Principles are applied and leveraged in public debate, development, and policy making
    • Help others understand the critical role OpenStand Principles have in innovation and the future of technology development
    • Encourage your organization to support OpenStand

If you represent an organization is a Standards Development Organization (SDO), and you’d like to jointly affirm the OpenStand principles for your organization, please contact us.

If your organization is not an SDO, and you would like to submit a public endorsement on behalf of your organization (company, firm, institution, etc.) for OpenStand, please contact us.

Thank you for your support of OpenStand!

blog-openstand-survey-results-question-3-definition-of-open-standards-changing-in-the-future

As we’ve discussed in our last two posts, OpenStand recently conducted a survey of the global open development community regarding the present and future state of open standards.  For our third and final question, we wanted to get a sense of whether respondents feel the definition of open standards will change over time.  A majority of respondents, approximately 77%, seemed to think the definition would change or evolve in some way, while a number feel current definitions and/or the OpenStand definition is sufficient.  Many respondents expressed concern about cost, accessibility and IP/patents.While you can read the full survey responses here, we’ve highlighted a selection of responses to our third and final question, below.

Do you see the definition “open standards” changing in the future? If so, how?

———————————————————————————————-

“No. Copyright, trademark and patent are all temporary protections to motivate IP developers. Big picture, all ideas of merit are shared.”

-Mike, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“As the standard systems grow more complex, explicit broader concepts like ‘standards family’ and narrower ones such as ‘standard aspect’ could become useful to capture nuances in the emerging diversity. Initiatives and organizations such as such as Open Stand and W3C have a key role to play balancing standardization efforts between institutional interests on one hand and private initiatives on the other.”

-Damien, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“I think that OpenStand has it just right.”

-Russ, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“I think software patents will become increasingly disreputable, and that major public facing companies will increasingly avoid them for reputational reasons.”

-Simon Brooke, United Kingdom

———————————————————————————————-

“Electronic health records might be a good test case. What do we value more? Convenience, privacy, reliability?”

-Kurt Sommerhauser, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“I hope that an “open standard” continues to mean that a standard can be freely adopted, implemented, and extended.”

-Abraham Becker, Avalon Consulting LLC, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Freely available, free to acquire, free to comment, contribute and maintain.”

-Malcolm, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“I hope it doesn’t, but chances are the buzz word might overtake the actual meaning.”

-Taelor, Careca Web, United Kingdom

———————————————————————————————-

“Yes I see open standards changing the way the world thinks about all standards making them more universal (sic bad word) worldwide and diverse.”

-Wolf, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“I hope to see the definition “open standards” turning into something that companies use to advertise their products and services and consumers use as a criteria for their choices. I do see it turning from something that refers mostly to the company-originated technologies of today to anything that people create either as a team or as a single entity and feel the need to share with the world with a blink of an eye, advancing the world to the next level of collective innovation.”

-Anastasios Chatzithomaoglou, Forthnet, Greece

———————————————————————————————-

“’Free standards’ would sound better.”

-Jose Paulo Cunha, UERJ, Brazil

———————————————————————————————-

“I see collaborative development of “pre-standard” specs being developed online and in public happening more and more. Accommodating the IP rights and process back into open standards bodies will be challenging. Possibly we will see more loosely federated standards that are not governed in the traditional sense.”

-Steve Midgley, Mixrun, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“‘Sponsored’ open standards may have vendors (or groups of competitors) promoting standards that will give them a competitive edge.”

-Robert, Boeri, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Open, in my mind, means free ‘as in freedom’. In the future I would like to see all open standards implemented under (and protected by) an Open Source license.”

-Dimitrios Bouras, Greece

———————————————————————————————-

“No, it is correct and clear.”

-Fulcieri Maltini, France

———————————————————————————————-

“Yes. Open standards will become more and more of a political football as we see more and more nation states increasing their involvement in military and industrial espionage.”

-Frank Rose, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Hopefully, Open Standards will reflect transparency in all types of affairs.”

-Sven Pedersen, United States

———————————————————————————————-

If you have thoughts or questions, feel free to leave a comment!

 

blog-openstand-survey-results-question-2-threats-and-opportunities-for-open-standards
As we mentioned in our last post, OpenStand celebrated its two-year anniversary on August 29. We recently surveyed supporters and the global open development community regarding the present and future state of open standards and open development. All survey responses can be found here.
Our second survey question asked respondents to identify top threats and opportunities to open standards. Primary concerns center on the challenges of setting and maintaining standards between countries and regions, as well as the influence of large corporate interest and governments in the standards development process.  For your consideration, we have highlighted some of the survey responses below:

“What is the single biggest threat or opportunity you see related to open standards today? How do you think this should be addressed?”

———————————————————————————————-

“There are no threats. Open Standards are similar to creative processes through history. Any idea of any value is seen, assimilated and added to as appropriate in new work. All ideas are used and appropriated.”

-Mike, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Conflict in the standard setting between the countries. Neither the US standard nor other individual country’s standard is the global standard at all. Do not consider as “we are the number one” or “our policy is the best for all people”. This sort of arrogance may create many conflicts. I found the many examples including China vs. Japan/Vietnam/Philippine and Russia vs. the US/Europe.”

-Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“The biggest threat to open standards is the ability of large vendors to acquire companies that use open standards to introduce competitive products. This allows large companies with diverse product lines to push their complete product lines that use closed standards and hence prevent competition.”

-Kenneth Martin, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“No real threat rather many opportunities, especially for the emerging economies.”

-Domenico, Italy

———————————————————————————————-

“Duplicate, or very similar, standards in the same domain. Each given domain should be decomposable into an agreeable set of components. Having multiple open standards, which define the components and messaging, can lead to interoperability issues just as hav(ing) no standards does. Culling or merging duplicate standards is probably the best way to address this issue so that the impact is minimized on systems based on the standards.”

-Lewis Collier, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Partially open standards are a significant threat already. Often vendor initiated, those only publicize a subset of a given standard (e.g. the consumer side of an API) while keeping other parts proprietary (e.g. the producer side of an API).”

-Damien, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“Some governments are only able to reference “formal” standards in their regulations. This means that existing voluntary standards cannot be considered for important regulations such as emergency services.”

-Russ, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Proprietary intellectual property claims for design ideas incorporated into open standards. ISC and other non-profit open source organizations, can help by developing an initial implementation to prove the concept, WITHOUT adding restrictive IPR.”

-Vicky Risk, Internet Systems Consortium, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Cost. Standards bodies are charging ridiculous prices. Commercial budgets are constrained- and we can’t even see the Standard content until after purchase. Want real take-u(p) of Standards? Make them cheap or free.”

– Malcolm, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“Governments, they tend to try to control what they do not understand and seeing as they don’t understand the internet, they use the buzz words without understanding the underlying concepts therefore failing.”

-Wolf, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“Biggest Threat – Industry would be ruled my very few super rich multinational companies exploiting the whole world and totally blocking the path of innovation, i.e., technological development. Biggest Opportunity – Level Playing field for all to participate, un-leas(h)ing explosive technological development environment”

-Mukul Sinha, India

———————————————————————————————-

“The biggest threat is the lobbying large corporations are trying to achieve in order to control their so-called technological basis. This could be addressed by making them understand that open standards are for their benefit too, as long as they try to invest in having their innovations open to the world, breaking any artificial barriers to interoperability and focusing on collective empowerment.”

-Anastasios Chatzithomaoglou, Forthnet, Greece

———————————————————————————————-

“The biggest threat of open standards is losing diversity. Also, in some case(s), a second level technology can get a popularity due to the popularity of open standards.”

-Jong Kim, Pohang University of Science and Technology

(POSTECH), South Korea

———————————————————————————————-

“I think that open standards for software and data compatibility (are) a big challenge. This could improve the quality and associated costs of software and ease data exchange.”

-Jose Paulo Cunha, UERJ, Brazil

———————————————————————————————-

“Sustainable revenue for standards organizations is the biggest challenge. We should support standards bodies to charge fees for certain services and hold them accountable for making sure they remain inclusive and freely accessible.”

-Steve Midgley, Mixrun, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Security. On the one hand, hackers learn about vulnerabilities in applications based on standards. On the other hand, having many eyes can mitigate or eliminate those vulnerabilities, although this sometimes requires delays that keep vulnerabilities possible longer than might be the case with proprietary solutions.”

-Robert Boeri, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Probably the gravest threat to open standards today is to allow proliferation of software patents and the adoption of proprietary extensions like digital restrictions management (DRM) “plug-ins” into universal Web standards such as HTML, harming innovation and global interoperability. A firm NO to software patents and DRM is the only answer.”

-Dimitrios Bouras, Greece

———————————————————————————————-

“The biggest single threat that I see to open standards today is a powerful government putting policies into place that would circumnavigate open standards in the name of ‘security’.”

-John Vail, FSCJ, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Biggest threat is possibly restricting the free interchange of information and permitting easier censorship. This is a National problem and Nations must be made to see that open standards are eventually in their best interests. This is a political problem which must be solved politically before it can be addressed technically.”

-Frank, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“That professional bodies – including signatories to OpenStandards such as IEEE, and international bodies like IEC keep their standards behind expensive paywalls preventing their adoption or improvement. I also see a significant threat is the use of the term OpenStandards applied to bodies that don’t actually practice open standards.”

-Mitra Ardron, Lumeter Networks, United States

———————————————————————————————-

If you have thoughts or questions, feel free to leave a comment!

 

openstand-blog-survey-question-1-changed-the-world-open-standards

 

On August 29th, OpenStand celebrated its two-year anniversary. A week earlier, we reached out to supporters and the global open development community with a simple, three question survey, hoping to gather thoughts and insights about the present and future state of open standards and open development.We received solid response, which you can review here. In this post, we’ve highlighted select responses to our first question:   

“How have open standards changed the world over the last 25 years?”

———————————————————————————————-

“In technology development, open standards are the fundamental pillars for the worldwide economic growth and progression in all sectors of the economy.”

-German M Fajardo Muriel, OhmTel Ltda, Colombia

———————————————————————————————-

“Open standards open markets to everyone. They support innovation and competition in the marketplace. They allow users to choose the best to fit their own needs. They are a boon to advancing technology to better the future of mankind.”

-Kenneth Martin, U.S.A.

———————————————————————————————-

“Open Standards have allowed large and complex problems to be decomposed into smaller, more manageable pieces, so that solutions can created as a system of systems. Each component of the problem serves as a reusable part for the initial solution as well as for additional applications where the initial part was developed. Open Standards provide the means of defining the messages and transport mechanisms to allow for the larger system of systems to be built and maintained.”

-Lewis Collier, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Open standards are the substrate innovative ideas thrive on, where they can grow and develop based on their merits.”

-Damien, Australia

———————————————————————————————-

“Voluntary standards have been critical to the development and global adoption of the Internet. Without open standards, the social and economic benefits that the Internet has brought to 3 billion people would have taken many more years to take place.”

-Russ, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Well, *without* open standards, the Internet as a whole would definitely have collapsed under the tremendous entropy created by the expansion of applications, network device roles, and different implementations. It is just amazing, given the end-to-end complexity, that it works so well, and that is due largely to the open standards. The whole process of developing and maintaining open standards has also helped to maintain the infrastructure and atmosphere for continued collaboration and cooperation between major technology and infrastructure providers over the years, as the Internet itself has increasingly become a venue for intense commercial competition.”

-Vicky Risk, Internet Systems Consortium, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“We are making the web more accessible to persons that would not have had the opportunity to do so without open standards. The sense of community is fantastic, and we are seeing a large market share being taken up by these collaborative policies which is changing the way software is built and marketed.”

-Taelor, Careca Web, United Kingdom

———————————————————————————————-

“1. To expand industry, 2. To expand Usage, 3. To encourage entrepreneurship, 4. To set a level playing field for economically weaker countries / companies to enter the market, 5. To unite the world.”

-Mukul Sinha, India

———————————————————————————————-

“Better products and lower prices due to global competition, information available to everyone, global interoperability, faster innovation and transparent processes are some of the things that have entered our lives and made them better.”

-Anastasios Chatzithomaoglou, Forthnet, Greece

———————————————————————————————-

“They have allowed progress to move more quickly. Otherwise we would have stove-piped systems that never inter-operate. Each one would require specialization and rampup, much of which might not be transferable to another manufacturer’s product. It would be an enormous waste of energy. Our productivity would be lower.”

-Lawrence Bressler, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“It has made innovation possible outside large corporations and leveled the field for ‘honest’ competition.”

-George Refseth, Norway

———————————————————————————————-

“During the last 25 years open standards have fueled computing and networking innovation, spawning the digital age as we know it today and an online market size estimated in the trillions of dollars, implemented almost exclusively with free software, created at a global scale by and for the community.”

-Dimitrios Bouras, Greece

———————————————————————————————-

“Open standards were key to the development of the internet and to people being able to collaborate and work together to adopt them and more importantly to improve them. They evolved – unlike the closed ones of ITU etc (remember X.400).”

-Mitra Ardron, Lumeter Networks, United States

———————————————————————————————-

“Access has reduced the excuse that reading and understanding the standard was difficult because of the cost of acquiring many standards. easy access always means more use.”

-Andy, Canada

———————————————————————————————-

“Open standards allow people to excel together to create the best world possible. The resulting innovation and freedom for global good raises the potential for equality, education and life enhancement for all.”

-Janna Anderson, United States

———————————————————————————————-

Many of these benefits are featured in our 10 Benefits of Open Standards Infographic, which is available for download or site embedding!  

If you have thoughts or questions, please leave a comment!

 

On 29 August 2012, IEEE, ISOC, W3C, IETF and IAB jointly affirmed the OpenStand Principles and launched the OpenStand website. The goal of OpenStand remains simple: to mobilize ongoing, global support for the application of open, market-driven principles in technology and standards development.

Through the OpenStand paradigm, we encourage the development of market driven standards that are global and open—enabling standards without borders and driving innovation for the benefit of humanity. In celebration of OpenStand’s two-year anniversary, our upcoming posts will take a look back, and  look ahead, with the help of our community of sponsors.

Over the past two years, the OpenStand principles have successfully:

  • Articulated the values that have driven innovation and market growth for last 25 years
  • Served as a relevant, influential and unifying set of values that support the open standards and technology development community
  • Inspired collaboration beyond technology and standards, into other areas of innovation

By rallying the open development around a time-tested, and common set of values, the OpenStand Principles are increasingly leveraged in public dialog, debate, policy discussions and technology development environments. As OpenStand advocacy grows, global support for the OpenStand Principles and the values of openness, transparency and inclusiveness in technology and standards development will increase. As this happens, the open development community can leverage the OpenStand principles to develop new models for technology collaboration that build upon past success, while addressing today’s challenges.

The OpenStand paradigm and principles based on the effective and efficient standardization processes that have made the Internet and Web the premiere platforms for innovation and borderless commerce that are extensible to other technologies.  They are time-tested and have proven critical to driving the global technology advancements that have served humanity so well in past decades.  The OpenStand Principles stress inclusion and voluntary market adoption — empowering economies around the world to drive global standards deployment, fueled by technology innovation.

Looking ahead, as the world seeks to solve modern collaboration, standardization, security and privacy challenges, applying these principles will play an essential role in securing the future of open, inclusive, market-driven innovation.

Building awareness to preserve these time-tested principles will help secure a future of open, market-driven innovation.  As such, it is our hope that OpenStand values will form the bedrock for future technology innovation.

In the coming weeks we will feature some perspectives from other OpenStand advocates regarding the current and future state of open development based on our survey responses. We hope you’ll stay tuned for more posts and be sure to provide us your comments.

Thank you for standing with us.

OpenStand 2 year anniversary