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OpenStand was formed to align standards development organizations and the open development community itself with a time-tested set of principles or values for open, collaborative, market-driven technology development.  It is our hope that our supporters will carry those values into every-day life and apply them to collaboration, consensus-building, development, policy making, technology development and public awareness efforts.  Here’s how you can become an OpenStand Advocate.

  • Sign Your Name on our public registry, as show of your private or corporate support
  • Become personally active:
    • Embody the principles in a personal/professional capacity
    • Become informed on key areas of national/international debate and policy making that impact the future of open technology development
    • Help ensure OpenStand Principles are applied and leveraged in public debate, development, and policy making
    • Help others understand the critical role OpenStand Principles have in innovation and the future of technology development
    • Encourage your organization to support OpenStand

If you represent an organization is a Standards Development Organization (SDO), and you’d like to jointly affirm the OpenStand principles for your organization, please contact us.

If your organization is not an SDO, and you would like to submit a public endorsement on behalf of your organization (company, firm, institution, etc.) for OpenStand, please contact us.

Thank you for your support of OpenStand!

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As we’ve discussed in our last two posts, OpenStand recently conducted a survey of the global open development community regarding the present and future state of open standards.  For our third and final question, we wanted to get a sense of whether respondents feel the definition of open standards will change over time.  A majority of respondents, approximately 77%, seemed to think the definition would change or evolve in some way, while a number feel current definitions and/or the OpenStand definition is sufficient.  Many respondents expressed concern about cost, accessibility and IP/patents.While you can read the full survey responses here, we’ve highlighted a selection of responses to our third and final question, below.

Do you see the definition “open standards” changing in the future? If so, how?

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“No. Copyright, trademark and patent are all temporary protections to motivate IP developers. Big picture, all ideas of merit are shared.”

-Mike, United States

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“As the standard systems grow more complex, explicit broader concepts like ‘standards family’ and narrower ones such as ‘standard aspect’ could become useful to capture nuances in the emerging diversity. Initiatives and organizations such as such as Open Stand and W3C have a key role to play balancing standardization efforts between institutional interests on one hand and private initiatives on the other.”

-Damien, Australia

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“I think that OpenStand has it just right.”

-Russ, United States

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“I think software patents will become increasingly disreputable, and that major public facing companies will increasingly avoid them for reputational reasons.”

-Simon Brooke, United Kingdom

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“Electronic health records might be a good test case. What do we value more? Convenience, privacy, reliability?”

-Kurt Sommerhauser, United States

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“I hope that an “open standard” continues to mean that a standard can be freely adopted, implemented, and extended.”

-Abraham Becker, Avalon Consulting LLC, United States

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“Freely available, free to acquire, free to comment, contribute and maintain.”

-Malcolm, Australia

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“I hope it doesn’t, but chances are the buzz word might overtake the actual meaning.”

-Taelor, Careca Web, United Kingdom

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“Yes I see open standards changing the way the world thinks about all standards making them more universal (sic bad word) worldwide and diverse.”

-Wolf, Australia

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“I hope to see the definition “open standards” turning into something that companies use to advertise their products and services and consumers use as a criteria for their choices. I do see it turning from something that refers mostly to the company-originated technologies of today to anything that people create either as a team or as a single entity and feel the need to share with the world with a blink of an eye, advancing the world to the next level of collective innovation.”

-Anastasios Chatzithomaoglou, Forthnet, Greece

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“’Free standards’ would sound better.”

-Jose Paulo Cunha, UERJ, Brazil

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“I see collaborative development of “pre-standard” specs being developed online and in public happening more and more. Accommodating the IP rights and process back into open standards bodies will be challenging. Possibly we will see more loosely federated standards that are not governed in the traditional sense.”

-Steve Midgley, Mixrun, United States

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“‘Sponsored’ open standards may have vendors (or groups of competitors) promoting standards that will give them a competitive edge.”

-Robert, Boeri, United States

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“Open, in my mind, means free ‘as in freedom’. In the future I would like to see all open standards implemented under (and protected by) an Open Source license.”

-Dimitrios Bouras, Greece

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“No, it is correct and clear.”

-Fulcieri Maltini, France

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“Yes. Open standards will become more and more of a political football as we see more and more nation states increasing their involvement in military and industrial espionage.”

-Frank Rose, United States

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“Hopefully, Open Standards will reflect transparency in all types of affairs.”

-Sven Pedersen, United States

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If you have thoughts or questions, feel free to leave a comment!

 

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As we mentioned in our last post, OpenStand celebrated its two-year anniversary on August 29. We recently surveyed supporters and the global open development community regarding the present and future state of open standards and open development. All survey responses can be found here.
Our second survey question asked respondents to identify top threats and opportunities to open standards. Primary concerns center on the challenges of setting and maintaining standards between countries and regions, as well as the influence of large corporate interest and governments in the standards development process.  For your consideration, we have highlighted some of the survey responses below:

“What is the single biggest threat or opportunity you see related to open standards today? How do you think this should be addressed?”

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“There are no threats. Open Standards are similar to creative processes through history. Any idea of any value is seen, assimilated and added to as appropriate in new work. All ideas are used and appropriated.”

-Mike, United States

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“Conflict in the standard setting between the countries. Neither the US standard nor other individual country’s standard is the global standard at all. Do not consider as “we are the number one” or “our policy is the best for all people”. This sort of arrogance may create many conflicts. I found the many examples including China vs. Japan/Vietnam/Philippine and Russia vs. the US/Europe.”

-Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University, United States

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“The biggest threat to open standards is the ability of large vendors to acquire companies that use open standards to introduce competitive products. This allows large companies with diverse product lines to push their complete product lines that use closed standards and hence prevent competition.”

-Kenneth Martin, United States

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“No real threat rather many opportunities, especially for the emerging economies.”

-Domenico, Italy

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“Duplicate, or very similar, standards in the same domain. Each given domain should be decomposable into an agreeable set of components. Having multiple open standards, which define the components and messaging, can lead to interoperability issues just as hav(ing) no standards does. Culling or merging duplicate standards is probably the best way to address this issue so that the impact is minimized on systems based on the standards.”

-Lewis Collier, United States

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“Partially open standards are a significant threat already. Often vendor initiated, those only publicize a subset of a given standard (e.g. the consumer side of an API) while keeping other parts proprietary (e.g. the producer side of an API).”

-Damien, Australia

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“Some governments are only able to reference “formal” standards in their regulations. This means that existing voluntary standards cannot be considered for important regulations such as emergency services.”

-Russ, United States

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“Proprietary intellectual property claims for design ideas incorporated into open standards. ISC and other non-profit open source organizations, can help by developing an initial implementation to prove the concept, WITHOUT adding restrictive IPR.”

-Vicky Risk, Internet Systems Consortium, United States

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“Cost. Standards bodies are charging ridiculous prices. Commercial budgets are constrained- and we can’t even see the Standard content until after purchase. Want real take-u(p) of Standards? Make them cheap or free.”

- Malcolm, Australia

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“Governments, they tend to try to control what they do not understand and seeing as they don’t understand the internet, they use the buzz words without understanding the underlying concepts therefore failing.”

-Wolf, Australia

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“Biggest Threat – Industry would be ruled my very few super rich multinational companies exploiting the whole world and totally blocking the path of innovation, i.e., technological development. Biggest Opportunity – Level Playing field for all to participate, un-leas(h)ing explosive technological development environment”

-Mukul Sinha, India

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“The biggest threat is the lobbying large corporations are trying to achieve in order to control their so-called technological basis. This could be addressed by making them understand that open standards are for their benefit too, as long as they try to invest in having their innovations open to the world, breaking any artificial barriers to interoperability and focusing on collective empowerment.”

-Anastasios Chatzithomaoglou, Forthnet, Greece

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“The biggest threat of open standards is losing diversity. Also, in some case(s), a second level technology can get a popularity due to the popularity of open standards.”

-Jong Kim, Pohang University of Science and Technology

(POSTECH), South Korea

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“I think that open standards for software and data compatibility (are) a big challenge. This could improve the quality and associated costs of software and ease data exchange.”

-Jose Paulo Cunha, UERJ, Brazil

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“Sustainable revenue for standards organizations is the biggest challenge. We should support standards bodies to charge fees for certain services and hold them accountable for making sure they remain inclusive and freely accessible.”

-Steve Midgley, Mixrun, United States

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“Security. On the one hand, hackers learn about vulnerabilities in applications based on standards. On the other hand, having many eyes can mitigate or eliminate those vulnerabilities, although this sometimes requires delays that keep vulnerabilities possible longer than might be the case with proprietary solutions.”

-Robert Boeri, United States

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“Probably the gravest threat to open standards today is to allow proliferation of software patents and the adoption of proprietary extensions like digital restrictions management (DRM) “plug-ins” into universal Web standards such as HTML, harming innovation and global interoperability. A firm NO to software patents and DRM is the only answer.”

-Dimitrios Bouras, Greece

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“The biggest single threat that I see to open standards today is a powerful government putting policies into place that would circumnavigate open standards in the name of ‘security’.”

-John Vail, FSCJ, United States

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“Biggest threat is possibly restricting the free interchange of information and permitting easier censorship. This is a National problem and Nations must be made to see that open standards are eventually in their best interests. This is a political problem which must be solved politically before it can be addressed technically.”

-Frank, United States

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“That professional bodies – including signatories to OpenStandards such as IEEE, and international bodies like IEC keep their standards behind expensive paywalls preventing their adoption or improvement. I also see a significant threat is the use of the term OpenStandards applied to bodies that don’t actually practice open standards.”

-Mitra Ardron, Lumeter Networks, United States

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If you have thoughts or questions, feel free to leave a comment!

 

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On August 29th, OpenStand celebrated its two-year anniversary. A week earlier, we reached out to supporters and the global open development community with a simple, three question survey, hoping to gather thoughts and insights about the present and future state of open standards and open development.We received solid response, which you can review here. In this post, we’ve highlighted select responses to our first question:   

“How have open standards changed the world over the last 25 years?”

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“In technology development, open standards are the fundamental pillars for the worldwide economic growth and progression in all sectors of the economy.”

-German M Fajardo Muriel, OhmTel Ltda, Colombia

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“Open standards open markets to everyone. They support innovation and competition in the marketplace. They allow users to choose the best to fit their own needs. They are a boon to advancing technology to better the future of mankind.”

-Kenneth Martin, U.S.A.

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“Open Standards have allowed large and complex problems to be decomposed into smaller, more manageable pieces, so that solutions can created as a system of systems. Each component of the problem serves as a reusable part for the initial solution as well as for additional applications where the initial part was developed. Open Standards provide the means of defining the messages and transport mechanisms to allow for the larger system of systems to be built and maintained.”

-Lewis Collier, United States

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“Open standards are the substrate innovative ideas thrive on, where they can grow and develop based on their merits.”

-Damien, Australia

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“Voluntary standards have been critical to the development and global adoption of the Internet. Without open standards, the social and economic benefits that the Internet has brought to 3 billion people would have taken many more years to take place.”

-Russ, United States

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“Well, *without* open standards, the Internet as a whole would definitely have collapsed under the tremendous entropy created by the expansion of applications, network device roles, and different implementations. It is just amazing, given the end-to-end complexity, that it works so well, and that is due largely to the open standards. The whole process of developing and maintaining open standards has also helped to maintain the infrastructure and atmosphere for continued collaboration and cooperation between major technology and infrastructure providers over the years, as the Internet itself has increasingly become a venue for intense commercial competition.”

-Vicky Risk, Internet Systems Consortium, United States

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“We are making the web more accessible to persons that would not have had the opportunity to do so without open standards. The sense of community is fantastic, and we are seeing a large market share being taken up by these collaborative policies which is changing the way software is built and marketed.”

-Taelor, Careca Web, United Kingdom

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“1. To expand industry, 2. To expand Usage, 3. To encourage entrepreneurship, 4. To set a level playing field for economically weaker countries / companies to enter the market, 5. To unite the world.”

-Mukul Sinha, India

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“Better products and lower prices due to global competition, information available to everyone, global interoperability, faster innovation and transparent processes are some of the things that have entered our lives and made them better.”

-Anastasios Chatzithomaoglou, Forthnet, Greece

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“They have allowed progress to move more quickly. Otherwise we would have stove-piped systems that never inter-operate. Each one would require specialization and rampup, much of which might not be transferable to another manufacturer’s product. It would be an enormous waste of energy. Our productivity would be lower.”

-Lawrence Bressler, United States

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“It has made innovation possible outside large corporations and leveled the field for ‘honest’ competition.”

-George Refseth, Norway

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“During the last 25 years open standards have fueled computing and networking innovation, spawning the digital age as we know it today and an online market size estimated in the trillions of dollars, implemented almost exclusively with free software, created at a global scale by and for the community.”

-Dimitrios Bouras, Greece

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“Open standards were key to the development of the internet and to people being able to collaborate and work together to adopt them and more importantly to improve them. They evolved – unlike the closed ones of ITU etc (remember X.400).”

-Mitra Ardron, Lumeter Networks, United States

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“Access has reduced the excuse that reading and understanding the standard was difficult because of the cost of acquiring many standards. easy access always means more use.”

-Andy, Canada

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“Open standards allow people to excel together to create the best world possible. The resulting innovation and freedom for global good raises the potential for equality, education and life enhancement for all.”

-Janna Anderson, United States

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Many of these benefits are featured in our 10 Benefits of Open Standards Infographic, which is available for download or site embedding!  

If you have thoughts or questions, please leave a comment!

 

On 29 August 2012, IEEE, ISOC, W3C, IETF and IAB jointly affirmed the OpenStand Principles and launched the OpenStand website. The goal of OpenStand remains simple: to mobilize ongoing, global support for the application of open, market-driven principles in technology and standards development.

Through the OpenStand paradigm, we encourage the development of market driven standards that are global and open—enabling standards without borders and driving innovation for the benefit of humanity. In celebration of OpenStand’s two-year anniversary, our upcoming posts will take a look back, and  look ahead, with the help of our community of sponsors.

Over the past two years, the OpenStand principles have successfully:

  • Articulated the values that have driven innovation and market growth for last 25 years
  • Served as a relevant, influential and unifying set of values that support the open standards and technology development community
  • Inspired collaboration beyond technology and standards, into other areas of innovation

By rallying the open development around a time-tested, and common set of values, the OpenStand Principles are increasingly leveraged in public dialog, debate, policy discussions and technology development environments. As OpenStand advocacy grows, global support for the OpenStand Principles and the values of openness, transparency and inclusiveness in technology and standards development will increase. As this happens, the open development community can leverage the OpenStand principles to develop new models for technology collaboration that build upon past success, while addressing today’s challenges.

The OpenStand paradigm and principles based on the effective and efficient standardization processes that have made the Internet and Web the premiere platforms for innovation and borderless commerce that are extensible to other technologies.  They are time-tested and have proven critical to driving the global technology advancements that have served humanity so well in past decades.  The OpenStand Principles stress inclusion and voluntary market adoption — empowering economies around the world to drive global standards deployment, fueled by technology innovation.

Looking ahead, as the world seeks to solve modern collaboration, standardization, security and privacy challenges, applying these principles will play an essential role in securing the future of open, inclusive, market-driven innovation.

Building awareness to preserve these time-tested principles will help secure a future of open, market-driven innovation.  As such, it is our hope that OpenStand values will form the bedrock for future technology innovation.

In the coming weeks we will feature some perspectives from other OpenStand advocates regarding the current and future state of open development based on our survey responses. We hope you’ll stay tuned for more posts and be sure to provide us your comments.

Thank you for standing with us.

OpenStand 2 year anniversary

 

Over the past two years, the OpenStand Principles and values have become an increasingly relevant, influential, unifying force in public discussion.  We’ve created this handy infographic to summarize these principles, below.  We encourage you to share this on your blog, website or within your circles of influence, to rally support for OpenStand!

OpenStand_5Principles_v4b

 

Please contact us if you would like a co-branded version of this graphic.

Get the embed code:

<a href=”http://www.open-stand.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/OpenStand_5Principles_v4b.png”><img class=”aligncenter” size-full wp-image-431″ src=”http://www.open-stand.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/OpenStand_5Principles_v4b.png” alt=”OpenStand_5Principles_v4b” width=”800″ height=”auto” /></a>

 

OpenStand 2 year anniversary

 

The OpenStand two year anniversary on August 29, 2014 will soon be upon us! As prepare to celebrate, we’d like to remind the open development community (that’s you!) about our simple, three-question survey to obtain feedback regarding the present and future state of open standards and open development.

The survey will take about 5-15 minutes to fill out, depending on how much you’d like to share with us.  The survey will be open through August 22nd at 11:59 pm.  After it closes, we’ll review all of the answers and highlight some of them in an upcoming blog post series later in the month and in September. Your answers could be featured!

We really hope that you will take a moment out of your day and voice your thoughts. You are welcome (and encouraged!) to share the survey and tell folks in your circle of influence about OpenStand!

Take the Survey Here

Thanks for standing with us in support of open innovation!

 

As we celebrate the two-year anniversary of OpenStand, we thought it was fitting to take a look at the ways open standards benefit individuals, companies, markets, industries, governments, nations  — in essence, the world. We encourage supporters to share this infographic with their circles of influence and to rally support for the OpenStand Principles.

10 Benefits of Open Standards

 

Get the embed code:

<a href=”http://www.open-stand.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/OpenStand_10Ways_v5.png”><img class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-432″ src=”http://www.open-stand.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/OpenStand_10Ways_v5.png” alt=”OpenStand_10Ways_v5″ width=”800″ height=”auto” /></a>

 

 We are approaching the two-year anniversary of OpenStand. There have been many dedicated presentations about OpenStand, and OpenStand has been featured in a good many presentations over the past two years. However, we thought we’d share our “What is OpenStand” presentation. Please feel free to download, share and embed this presentation:

OpenStand – Principles for Open Standards and Open Development

While you’re here — in celebration of OpenStand’s two-year anniversary, we also want to include the perspectives of our reader and supporter community regarding the present state and future of open standards. We’d appreciate your input.

We’ve created a simple, three-question survey should take you 5-15 minutes to complete, depending on how much feedback you provide.  We’ll be using your feedback to assemble some crowd-sourced posts that will appear on the blog in the August/September time frame.  Responses will be open and available to the public.

Take the Survey Here

The OpenStand principles do more than just align standards organizations – they have established a modern paradigm for standards and technology development that is open, collaborative, inclusive and market-driven.  It is our hope the OpenStand values will serve as the bedrock for future technology innovation, and that open standards continue to benefit people, industries, markets and nations of the world.

OpenStand 2 year anniversaryTwo years ago, on August 29, 2012, IAB, IEEE, IETF, ISOC and W3C agreed to affirm and uphold a set of established, time-tested principles that have helped drive innovation of the last two decades. The “OpenStand” Principles were drafted and jointly affirmed to help mobilize ongoing global support for the application of open, market-driven principles for standards and technology development. Since then, the OpenStand principles and values have become an increasingly relevant, influential, unifying force in public discussion.

As we approach our two-year anniversary, we are reaching out to OpenStand supporters to obtain feedback regarding the present and future state of open standards and open development.

We’ve created a relatively simple, three-question survey and we’d love your input! We will be reviewing and highlighting various responses on the OpenStand blog in a series of upcoming blog posts in August and September. Will you join us in celebrating and highlighting OpenStand’s anniversary by voicing your thoughts? We estimating this will be a 5-15 minute exercise, depending on how much you choose to share. We also welcome you to share this survey with others.

Thanks for standing with us in support of open innovation!

Take the Survey Here